An Introduction to International Relations: Australian by Richard Devetak, Anthony Burke, Jim George

By Richard Devetak, Anthony Burke, Jim George

Advent to diplomacy: Australian views presents entire insurance of its topic whereas taking pictures distinctively Australian views and matters. Designed for undergraduate scholars this textbook brings jointly prime Australian students to provide full of life introductory analyses of the theories, actors, matters, associations and procedures that animate diplomacy this day. creation to diplomacy: Australian views introduces scholars to the most theoretical views earlier than overlaying an intensive variety of themes with ancient, useful and normative dimensions.

Show description

Read or Download An Introduction to International Relations: Australian Perspectives PDF

Similar international & world politics books

International relations theory for 21st century

Diplomacy conception has been the positioning of excessive debate lately. A decade in the past it was once nonetheless attainable to divide the sphere among 3 major views – Realism, Liberalism, and Marxism. not just have those methods advanced in new instructions, they've been joined via a few new ‘isms’ vying for awareness, together with feminism and constructivism.

Normative Theory in International Relations: A Pragmatic Approach

Molly Cochran deals an account of the advance of normative idea in diplomacy over the last 20 years. specifically, she analyzes the tensions among cosmopolitan and communitarian methods to foreign ethics, being attentive to transformations of their remedies of an idea of the individual, the ethical status of states and the scope of ethical arguments.

Additional info for An Introduction to International Relations: Australian Perspectives

Sample text

Both also tend to take the state for granted as a form of political community, even if liberals are more likely to acknowledge the threat states pose to their own citizens. Liberalism, after all, emerged as a critical intervention against the disturbing concentration of state power in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Liberalism and realism diverge, however, over questions of war and law. Realists and liberals deplore war as a tragic and destructive phenomenon, but how they explain war varies.

Liberalism and realism diverge, however, over questions of war and law. Realists and liberals deplore war as a tragic and destructive phenomenon, but how they explain war varies. Realists see war as an inevitable and ineradicable part of international relations insofar as the condition of anarchy prevails (Waltz 1959). Liberals accept this description, but believe that change is possible. They argue that institutional change at the level of the state and the international system will release potentials for eradicating, or, at the very least, considerably limiting war.

Part 3, The New Agenda: Globalisation and Global Governance, covers topics that do not sit comfortably with the ‘Great Divide’. These topics can be generally included under the heading ‘globalisation and global governance’. Both these topics have spawned large industries of scholarly research, especially globalisation. An essentially contested term, globalisation has been defined as the ‘widening, deepening and speeding up of global interconnectedness’ made possible by new information, communication, and transportation technologies (Held et al 1999: 15).

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.20 of 5 – based on 36 votes