Locating China: Space, Place, and Popular Culture by Jing Wang

By Jing Wang

Taking a multidisciplinary technique, this quantity examines the connection among house and the creation of neighborhood pop culture in modern China. The foreign workforce of individuals study the inter-relationship among the cultural imaginary of a given position and China’s carrying on with force in the direction of urbanization. This has resulted in the advance of recent areas and locations, and new varieties of spatial practices that destabilize outdated recommendations of the ‘local’ and ‘locality’. providing ethnographic observations and theoretical speculations, this work furthers our figuring out of the hyperlink among spatial pondering and the construction of patron tradition in China.

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Locating China: Space, Place, and Popular Culture

Taking a multidisciplinary technique, this quantity examines the connection among area and the construction of neighborhood pop culture in modern China. The foreign crew of participants learn the inter-relationship among the cultural imaginary of a given position and China’s carrying on with force in the direction of urbanization.

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In so far as contemporary Chinese smut is legalistic to the point of sheer didacticism, it “popularizes the new legal culture” rather than challenges it. Her essay implies that the socialist state plays a rather complicated role in the popularity of smut. Official anti-smut campaigns tell only half of the story. The predominant trope of law and order in the current “semi-yellow” literature, while continuing the Confucian legacy of taming the pornographic (Wang 2001e), has imparted to contemporary smut a schizophrenic drive toward eroticization of violence and moral edification at the same time.

As a historian, Perdue is methodologically keen (and successful) in thinking space through history. He asks particularly how China’s spatial imagination was carried over from empire to nation. The space examined under his analytical lens is the geopolitical space of the modern state and its various canonical projects, each paired with an imperial precedent serving to legitimate controversial territorial claims. He discusses three such hegemonic projects. Each project produced orthodox historical narratives to support the vision of a unified national space, leaving little room for autonomous space or alternative histories of ethnic minorities to emerge.

In 2002, a new form of a “networked” alliance called “Advertising Association of Provincial TV Stations” came into being. This alliance enabled twentynine provincial stations to play the same commercials during the evening segment of CCTV’s National News Broadcast starting on January 14, 2004 (Editors of Meijie 2003: 25–26). This strategic move offered Chinese corporate clients an alternative to the CCTV. It is likely that the latter’s monopoly over prime-time TV advertising revenue may be broken as a result.

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